Choosing a training provider

Ansie Snyders,head of training at Sage VIP

Ansie Snyders,head of training at Sage VIP

Many companies see training as a luxury, so it is often one of the first areas organisations cut back on when their budgets come under pressure. While the value of on-the-job training is indisputable, there are certain skills and competencies where formal training programmes and courses can deliver an excellent return on investment for the business.

Many companies see training as a luxury, so it is often one of the first areas organisations cut back on when their budgets come under pressure. While the value of on-the-job training is indisputable, there are certain skills and competencies where formal training programmes and courses can deliver an excellent return on investment for the business.

Ansie Snyders, head of training at Sage VIP, says rather than cutting back on their investments in training when the economy is under pressure, organisations should ensure they’re getting quality and value for money from training. That starts with choosing the right training provider.

The fact that a training provider has all the right accreditations is not enough on its own to guarantee its services are of a high quality or that it will meet a company’s needs, says Snyders. She offers five criteria companies can use to ensure delivery of quality programmes.

Find a reputable partner

When you’re evaluating training providers, take the time to investigate their reputation in the market. Ask each provider you are considering for some reference sites, and be sure to contact them to find out about their experiences. This will take five minutes of your time, but may save you thousands in training costs.

Evaluate the trainer

Find out which trainers will be responsible for delivering the training on the courses you are considering, and evaluate their expertise and qualifications on the subject matter. Someone with a strong, proven theoretical grounding is good; a trainer with practical experience in the field is even better because he or she will be able to talk about real-life situations.

Specify outcomes

Training is expensive so businesses need to be sure what outcomes they expect from their investment in a course or workshop for an employee. Look closely at the course overview and determine beforehand if it will fulfil your needs. If you are choosing training on behalf of your employee, discuss the expected outcome with him or her. Ask the provider for a detailed course outline and discuss how each topic on the list will cover the employee’s training needs with him or her before the course commences.

Look at the take-home value

It’s not enough for the training course to deliver practical skills and knowledge that the employee can apply as soon as he or she returns to the office – it must also offer value in the materials the employee gets to take away from the sessions. Researchers estimate most individuals remember less than 20% of what they learn during a training intervention. For that reason, a course’s value is vastly increased when the employee leaves with reference manuals, online support, and other such tools and materials.

Assess the learner

The topic of assessments can be controversial. Some people believe they unsettle the learner, while others believe they’re essential to the learning process. Whichever side of the fence you sit on, choose a provider that aligns with your needs.

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